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Jun 08, 2022 View:

Rum infusion

I live in a country that monopolizes the alcohol production. I can, however, buy pure beverage grade alcohol for roughly $1.75 per liter.

I understand the best time to infuse flavors into rum is during distillation but unfortunately I do not have this option. What would be the procedure to go from pure alcohol to infused rum without it tasting like it was infused in the kitchen.

Daniel


Reply:

I live in a country that monopolizes the alcohol production. I can, however, buy pure beverage grade alcohol for roughly $1.75 per liter.

I understand the best time to infuse flavors into rum is during distillation but unfortunately I do not have this option. What would be the procedure to go from pure alcohol to infused rum without it tasting like it was infused in the kitchen.

Daniel


Reply:

Rum is not an infusion of flavours into beverage-grade alcohol. If you wish to make it taste like it wasn't infused in the kitchen, you had better not infuse it in the kitchen.

Daniel, please find your answer at a hobbyist site (spirits production is legal as a hobby in New Zealand), because there are only commercial producers on this forum, who cannot be seen condoning your activity.


Reply:

Hi Daniel,

The "rum flavors" come from the congeners that are produced by yeast during fermentation of sugar cane products. The art of the distiller is to seperate the good congeners from the bad congeners by distilling them. There are no short cuts in making real rum.

Now that does not mean that you could not purchase a sugar cane based alcohol and add flavors such as caramel and spice to artificially flavor your product. It would be very much like the big brand name rums that are already on the shelf at very competive prices.

Perhaps you should first decide if you want to be a blending house or a distillery and then create your brand accordingly.

Good luck!


Reply:

Hi Daniel,

The "rum flavors" come from the congeners that are produced by yeast during fermentation of sugar cane products. The art of the distiller is to seperate the good congeners from the bad congeners by distilling them. There are no short cuts in making real rum.

Now that does not mean that you could not purchase a sugar cane based alcohol and add flavors such as caramel and spice to artificially flavor your product. It would be very much like the big brand name rums that are already on the shelf at very competive prices.

Perhaps you should first decide if you want to be a blending house or a distillery and then create your brand accordingly.

Good luck!


Reply:

Thank you for the post. You have precisely understood my dilema. I cannot be a distiller due to my country not allowing anyone to produce alcohol other then the government owned monopoly distiller.

I therefore am forced to be a blender not by choice. I do not however see much information on blending with fruit and other tropical ingredients. That is where I need help. Thanks for the insight.

Daniel


Reply:

Do you have to use the alcohol that they produce? Or can you purchase bulk spirits from another country?


Reply:

Contact one of the international flavor companies. I'm sure they can assist you, if you're mysterious country's rulers will allow it.


Reply:

Can you re-distill the bought alcohol with flavors?

You don't produce anything that way, you only add flavor.

I cannot be a distiller due to my country not allowing anyone to produce alcohol other then the government owned monopoly distiller.

Daniel


Reply:

I have to use their alcohol if I want to sell in the country. If not then I am just an importer. I can buy the bulk spirits for roughly $1.75 per liter. Why do you ask?

Thanks.


Reply:

Donut, do you mind if I ask what country you're in? I'm pretty decent at finding laws and perhaps I could find something to solve your dilemma. I'm not finding any country that restricts alcohol production only to the government.

One cannot make real rum from neutral alcohol just by adding flavors; that would be imitation rum and it would taste like imitation rum. If you're not permitted to distill spirits in your country, you're going to have to either import a rum or find a different category of spirits to produce.

There are many, many authentic and historical spirits and liqueurs made from neutral spirits and either infused fruits and botanicals or added essential oils and flavors, but rum isn't one of them.


Reply:

Donut, do you mind if I ask what country you're in? I'm pretty decent at finding laws and perhaps I could find something to solve your dilemma. I'm not finding any country that restricts alcohol production only to the government.

One cannot make real rum from neutral alcohol just by adding flavors; that would be imitation rum and it would taste like imitation rum. If you're not permitted to distill spirits in your country, you're going to have to either import a rum or find a different category of spirits to produce.

There are many, many authentic and historical spirits and liqueurs made from neutral spirits and either infused fruits and botanicals or added essential oils and flavors, but rum isn't one of them.