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Jun 08, 2022 View:

Differnt Strains of Yease

Has any one ever mixed two different strains of Yeast? If so what were your results. Coop


Reply:

I use three strains in sequence for in-bottle sparkling cider/perry. A slow fermenter with really good aromatics, followed by another that mops up any residual sugar and then an encapsuled yeast in tirage to speed riddling.

I've also tried the chr hansen non-sacchromyces blends. 2-3 dry yeasts blended to have different pitching rates, and so simulate a native-yeast succession. The results with a dessert cultivar blend of apples wasn't notable.


Reply:

Not to put out Todd's business, but he may have some input.

http://adiforums.com/index.php?showtopic=1550&view=findpost&p=8795


Reply:

I switched to a different strain a few weeks ago bc i liked the flavor profile of the new yeast better. Realized I wasn't getting full attenuation sfter s few brews though. So a did half and half new and old. Full attenuation and nice profile.

Its my understanding that there can be a more dominant strain that would take over the fermentation. At least with beer yeast.


Reply:

Not to put out Todd's business, but he may have some input.

http://adiforums.com/index.php?showtopic=1550&view=findpost&p=8795


Reply:

We've gotten some really nice results with a combination of wine or brewing yeast followed by distiller's yeast. The flavor profiles are excellent but Denver's right, you have to have your stuff together to maintain consistency.


Reply:

We've gotten some really nice results with a combination of wine or brewing yeast followed by distiller's yeast. The flavor profiles are excellent but Denver's right, you have to have your stuff together to maintain consistency.


Reply:

Has any one ever mixed two different strains of Yeast? If so what were your results. Coop


Reply:

Hey Chris, sorry for the late response. For some reason the forum stopped auto-emailing me when there's a response to one of these threads.

Co-cultures are complicated environments. Your yeasts will produce different compounds in different environments. If you stress one yeast by putting it in later in the fermentation (low free nitrogen, low glucose, etc) it may produce some really interesting flavors, and very little ethanol, but add interesting flavor notes to your finished spirit. Timing your innoculations can be difficult if you don't have good analytical. It's rarely as simple as; wait until day 3, add second yeast. It's usually better to track something like brix and pH and pitch at a specific point in the process. If you don't keep track of such things and pitch consistently using some analytical measure, your product will be subject to variation.


Reply:

Makes sense... thanks for that John.